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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 586 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> reporter: we're outside the historic howard theater, chuck brown couldn't be here for the grand opening some weeks ago. he's here tonight in spirit. and as hundreds if not thousands of people gather to give chuck a d.c. sendoff. >> we lost a great one so we got to celebrate his life and his legacy. >> i love chuck brown. i've been listening to him all my life every school dance. ♪ >> reporter: d.c. mayor gray says he may open the washington convention center for chuck brown's funeral. >> chuck was a great human being. and frankly a good friend of mine. >> reporter: tributes were pouring in from the high and mighty to the low for the father of go go. >> he flew off the covers and made people understand we are a lot more than a government town. >> probably tell the city to party hard for him tonight. he really would tell the city to party hard. this is a devastating loss. >> reporter: got a gramny mom nation? >> oh my god. unbelievable. ♪ >> reporter: chuck brown was 75. he began performing back in the 1960s. by the '70s when the rest of the country was deep into disco, d.c. had the o
. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we assess what's behind the downward trend, and whether it's likely to continue into the summer travel season. >> woodruff: then, we update the battle for the presidency in egypt as a muslim brotherhood candidate wins a spot in the runoff elections next month. >> brown: ray suarez examines the lasting legacy of the case of the missing child etan patz. >> woodruff: miles o'brien reports on safety measures at u.s. nuclear plants, and asks are they ready for a worst-case scenario, a fukushima-like meltdown? >> the i anybodya against change and against improvement, i think it's something we have to be vigilant about and push so the regulator can make sure that change happens. >> david >> brown: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and we talk to pulitzer prize winning author stephen greenblatt about his new book, the story of the rediscovery of an ancient manuscript and its influence even today. >> one day, it is on the shelf and not instantly but decisively the world changes. >> woodruff: that's all
.1% in april, but job growth was down a little from march. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we analyze the new numbers, and assess the prospects of work for college graduates and other young people entering the job market. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez examines the apparent easing of the diplomatic crisis between beijing and washington over a blind activist, as chinese officials said today he can apply to study abroad. >> brown: margaret warner talks with author peter bergen about his new book "manhunt," a look at the long pursuit and final days of osama bin laden. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close tonight with a look at a national effort to engage young people at the local level through the music of marvin gaye and their own artistic expressions. >> brown: and we close we're like a broken down city. it's not just the economy that is causing cleveland the problem right now. it's the attitude; it's the struggle. we need to make a change. that's what i am expecting people to hear
from a bridge. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we go inside the courtroom at today's sentencing and explore the issues in a case that captured national attention. >> ifill: then, we examine a lawsuit filed by catholic leaders, institutions and schools against the obama administration for mandating birth control coverage for employees. >> brown: from our american graduate series, paul solman reports on a move to keep kids in school by teaching skills both inside and outside the classroom. >> high school dropouts here in bloomington, illinois building low income houses like those very homes behind me. is this the way to get kids back to school and into the work force? >> ifill: judy woodruff assesses the nato summit, as world leaders agree to hand over security in afghanistan by the middle of next year. >> brown: and we remember powerful german baritone dietrich fischer-dieskau. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breath
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: the blind chinese activist now in a beijing hospital has changed his mind and wants to come to america, and he spoke by phone to congressmen in washington, saying he fears his family and friends are in danger. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the still unfolding story that's left u.s. officials struggling to resolve a tense diplomatic situation. >> brown: then, on the "daily download," we examine how the campaigns are using twitter hashtags to get out their messages. >> suarez: miles o'brien profiles a small private company trying to position itself for a big role in exploring frontiers in space. >> i'm talking about setting ultimately tens of thousands, virtually millions of people to mars and then going out there and exploring the stars. >> brown: judy woodruff talks with veteran congress-watchers thomas mann and norman ornstein, about extreme partisanship, the subject of their new book, "it's even worse than it looks." >> we've never s
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama today said definitively he now believes same-sex marriage should be legal. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we'll explore the president's evolution on the issue and talk about the debate going forward. >> brown: then, we turn to the political upset in indiana, where a tea party candidate toppled veteran senator richard lugar. >> ifill: we get new details about the would-be suicide bomber who was a double agent cooperating with the c.i.a. to foil an al-qaeda bomb plot. >> brown: from cambodia, fred de sam lazaro reports on one group's efforts to help homeless children have a brighter future. >> in make-shift gatherings like this one-part kindergarten part clinic, the children come to get cuts and scratches tended, to play board games or a rare luxury: to shampoo their hair. >> ifill: and ray suarez talks with steven lee myers of the new york times about the high-level, diplomatic drama that freed a chinese activist. >> brown: that's all ahe
candidate brown to verbally attack then-mayor fenty. tonight, many still want ton if mayor gray had knowledge of this. vincent gray's campaign for mayor was a long time ago but questions about what went on behind the scenes won't go away. mayor gray refused to talk about two of his campaign workers charged this week. >> this is an ongoing pending investigation and there is nothing, really, i can comment on and this is obviously continuing to unfold. >> reporter: according to authorities, brown was not lying when he said members of gray's campaign paid him to stay in the race. brown has always said that the mayor knew about it. the mayor always denied it. >> i think i will stay with what i said before and there is that continuing investigation. it has been for months. >> reporter: wednesday, gray's campaign worker howard brooks was charged with making a false statement to the fbi when he said he never gave money to brown's campaign. we went to brooks' silver spring home seeking comments but no one answered the door. before he was charged this morning, council hab mary chay, who led a
the family of singer/songwriter is discussing with officials a public sendoff. the 75-year-old brown died wednesday of organ failure at john hopkins hospital in baltimore. d.c. mayor vincent gray said he might make the washington convention center available for a public funeral. it is expected to attract thousands of fans and dignitaries who followed chuck brown during four decades. >>> this weekend the tributeses to the father of go-go kin. >> reporter: a lot of people are continuing to celebrate the life of chuck brown. of course u street a place no stranger to chuck brown. he practically played every single venue. here at the velvet lounge, everything inside is dedicated to the father of go-go. he may be gone but what he left behind for generations was the biggest gift key have given washington, a music like identity. >> go-go to the city is what chuck gave. >> it's going to be fun. >> it's easy to do because he had so much good. >> reporter: those listening to his music and remembers the godfather of go-go isn't just a way to celebrate his life but make sure his legacy is never forget
of civil rights is one of long struggle and long fought victoriesment meet wanda brown of the missouri house of representatives. she's leading a new march of progress with her landmark bill hb-1621. >> this bill creates an environment that an employer can't fire an employee if they own firearms, if they use firearms. if you target-- if you target practice, if you hunt, they wouldn't have the right to fire you for that reason. >> right, but aren't gun owners already protected? >> we have a second amendment to the constitution that should be abided by at all times. >> wanda's bill like a second condom adds another layer of protection against employers who would disregard the constitution. >> i think i understand. you're the kind of person that sees discrimination somewhere, and wants to fight it. >> yes. >> thanks to wanda brown's crusade against injustice, hb-1621 saled through the house by 115-36, releasing gun owners from the shackles of persecution. >> now a gun owner can own a gun, and no longer be fired for it. >> true. i'm not aware of anybody having that problem. >> since when co
of washington and made a surprise visit to afghanistan today. good evening. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown+ with peace. and pursuing a more hopeful fu as equal partners. to borrow words from this agreement, we are committed to seeking a future of justice, peace, security, and opportunity. and i'm confident that although our challenges are not yet behind us that the future before us is bright. >> ifill: later the president spoke to u.s. troops he plans to address the american people from afghanistan at 7:30 eastern time tonight. for more on all this, we turn to patrick quinn, kabul bureau chief for the associated press joining us now by telephone. patrick, when did you learn that a presidential visit was imminent? >> well, we only found out just shortly before he arrived. there were rumors he was coming. but it was a complete surprise, i think, to almost everybody in afghanistan that barack obama decided to come here on the anniversary of osama bin laden's death to sign this agreement. >> ifill: tell us what you can about this agreement. how significant is it? >> well, the deal is not... th
, they are discovering who they are, what they want to do, i had already known that. >> suarez: and jeffrey brown interviews a filmmaker who chronicled one wounded marine's journey from the frontlines in afghanistan to civilian life in north carolina. >> i actually brought in a lot of my own personal experiences of going to war and coming home from it and what i realized was that the fighting doesn't end when these men come back, it just continues in a different way. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breathing intelligence bringing people together to bring new ideas to life. >> look, it's so simple. >> in a year, the bright minds from inside and outside the company come together to work on an idea. adding to it from the road, improving it in the cloud, all in real time. >> good idea. >> it's the at&t network. providing new ways to work together, so business works better. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and fi
and made a surprise visit to afghanistan today. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm geoffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the president's visit and the agreement he signed with president karzai spelling out the continuing u.s. commitment after american combat troops leave. >> ifill: then our series on the aftermath of the financial crisis continues with a look at how consumers and banks have altered their spending and lending practices. >> brown: ray suarez examines a new study showing a dramatic rise in the number of babies born addicted to prescription painkillers. >> brown: and judy woodruff gets two views on how hard the u.s. should press china over human rights violations. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breathing intelligence bringing people together to bring new ideas to life. >> look, it's so simple. >> in a year, the bright minds from inside and outside the company come together to work on an idea. adding to it from the road, improving it i
'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the blind lawyer's escape, and the diplomatic dilemma his case poses for the obama administration. >> woodruff: then, we explore how apple and other tech companies take advantage of the tax code, and sidestep millions in state and federal taxes. >> ifill: ray suarez examines the debate in wisconsin over recalling the governor. is it an early test of pro and anti union power for the november elections? >> brown: judy woodruff assesses the strength and influence of al-qaeda one year after the death of osama bin laden. >> ifill: and we close with a look at the combat paper project, a program for veterans that turns uniforms into art. >> i felt like there was pressure building up and i had nowhere to turn, no outlet, and the first time i started cutting the uniform i was literally separating away, tearing away at the fibers of war. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> everybody wants to stay healthy. when i moved to the united
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 586 (some duplicates have been removed)